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"A friend once described me as a hunter of beauty. She noticed my particular preoccupation with things I considered beautiful, and how I was - rather selfishly, so she thought - drawn towards beautiful things and experiences. She felt I was distracted from other important issues which might have been more worthy of my attention, such as social justice and various other ethical responsibilities.

Having had more than a decade to reflect on this - not quite derogatory, not quite honorary title - that was bestowed upon me, I have had enough time to examine my habits and patterns, tendencies and inclinations, delights and desires, and I have become deeply satisfied with it. Being a Christian, I have come to understand my passion for beauty as a distinctly theological endeavour, because I believe that the beauty that exists in the world is a reflection of the God who created it, and is, therefore, an insight into the mind, the heart, the character; the very person of God Himself. And, therefore, the hunt for beauty, is the hunt for God."

Stuart Holloway is a graphic designer based in Haywards Heath, West Sussex and an Elder at Christ Church Haywards Heath. Stuart has an obsessive fascination with aesthetics and a belief that understanding what beauty is and how it functions, in light of Biblical revelation, is essential for reaching the world with the truth of the Gospel and for better discipleship of believers. Hunter of Beauty is an attempt to better understand beauty and to articulate its value to Christians.

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